Jean-Bernard Ouédraogo: Identités visuelles en Afrique

L’expansion de la société de marché occidentale est à juste titre considérée comme un processus ancien, mais une vision unilatérale propose toujours de ne voir ces découvertes réciproques que du point de vue étroit d’un élargissement eurocentré ; les sociétés africaines subiraient ainsi passivement l’influence des puissances dominatrices…
Cet ouvrage inscrit son analyse dans une mise à distance qui permet une observation des dynamiques internes et des  tendances évolutives des sociétés africaines contemporaines. Cette iconographie de l’Afrique n’est pas sans poser d’importants problèmes épistémologiques ni sans appeler un débat sérieux sur le rapport entre écrits et images dans l’argumentation discursive et sur le statut, en tant qu’archive, de miroir social des photographies.


Arts photographiques en Afrique. Technique et esthétique dans la photographie de studio au Burkina Faso

L'intérêt récent de la photographie africaine privilégie l'origine plastique des clichés reflets d'une réalité sociale considérée, à tort, comme simplement exotique. Ce livre propose une exploration minutieuse des rapports étroits reliant l'héritage technique incorporé en chacun et l'affirmation de principes esthétiques chez les photographes de studio. Il démontre qu'il est impossible de comprendre les définitions historiques du beau sans se référer aux éléments matériels et symboliques qui structurent et donnent sens, selon les tendances de la concurrence des valeurs, aux figurations convenues.

Recension par Allen F. Roberts dans African Arts, Vol. 40, No. 1, 2007, MIT Press:

Jean-Bernard Ouédraogo’s Arts photographiques en Afrique (2002) stands in contrast to Nimis’s work to date as one of the best recent books on photography in Africa or anywhere else in the world. The author proves himself a Burkinabé Barthes in his savvy grasp of relevant theoretical literatures, his ability to move back and forth between macro-models and compelling details, and his exceptionally nuanced ethnographic research of topics as hard-to-grasp as “style.” Ouédraogo’s academic French is not for the faint of heart, but the rereading of passages that may be required for even the most fluent of non-native speakers is well worth the effort. Image enthusiasts will be aghast at the omission of the last seventy illustrations to which frequent allusion is nonetheless made (shame on you, Harmattan!), but even this outrage should not detract from Ouédraogo’s signal accomplishment.

Ouédraogo’s principle hypotheses: that earlier African societies had their own, socially constructed perceptive devices that have been altered or abandoned. Here the author treads on the thin ice of essentialism, but manages to convince by the force of his arguments concerning the dynamism of Burkinabé visual culture brought about by or reflected in the adaptation of photography to changing aesthetic practices, especially in and after the 1930s.
Ouédraogo’s writing is at its Barthean best as he considers the rise of studio photography, through which “symbolic goods” are arranged according to “the local trading [bourse, as in “stock exchange”] of values” and “the space of photographic production…structures itself according to the privatizing evolution of society” (ibid, 162, 176). And in these contexts, as style is “invented” (and Ouédroago goes to great pains to allow Burkinabé photographers to put such an ethereal process into their own words and symbolic categories), “African photography…by its doubly artistic characteristics (technique and the production of objects), and by the fact that it is resolutely informed by the particularities of the autochthonous economy of senses, offers an excellent platform [tremplin, literally “trampoline”] from which to contest the power of ‘domino-centric’ axioms” (ibid, 250).

Ouédraogo bases his study on interviews with 119 Burkinabé photographers in 80 different studios, as well as with some of their clients. He investigates the etymologies and connotations of 150 relevant aesthetic terms in four local languages (Bobo, Jula, Mooré, and San), and carefully records photographers’ phrasing in local French idioms— the latter being the language of choice for discussing their art, interestingly enough. These words provide a first means of understanding local ways of seeing, and one revelation is the degree to which local words for “the face” emphasize the eyes, as in the San equation of face as “there where the eyes are” (2002: 36). “Ocularcentrism” is not a Modernist monopoly after all!
The author then considers the gaze, again through local concepts and expressions but leading to an extension of the assertions of Jonathan Crary (1992) concerning the “singularly historical fact that is the [cultural] construction of the observer” that defines the “person” through exteriorization and distancing (Ouédraogo 2002: 46, 52). As photography spread in Burkina Faso, “an important place was accorded the representation of the self as a modality of expressing the new man which commercial society called to its bidding” (ibid, 94). A further implication is that “vision is intimately tied to the political status of the subject,” with different “ways of seeing” defined by the emergence of competing classes and other “social orders” during the colonial period that led to creation of “allegorical commerce” (ibid, 52-4). These thoughts lead to one of Ouédraogo’s principle hypotheses: that earlier African societies had their own, socially constructed perceptive devices that have been altered or abandoned. Here the author treads on the thin ice of essentialism, but manages to convince by the force of his arguments concerning the dynamism of Burkinabé visual culture brought about by or reflected in the adaptation of photography to changing aesthetic practices, especially in and after the 1930s.
Ouédraogo’s writing is at its Barthean best as he considers the rise of studio photography, through which “symbolic goods” are arranged according to “the local trading [bourse, as in “stock exchange”] of values” and “the space of photographic production…structures itself according to the privatizing evolution of society” (ibid, 162, 176). And in these contexts, as style is “invented” (and Ouédroago goes to great pains to allow Burkinabé photographers to put such an ethereal process into their own words and symbolic categories), “African photography…by its doubly artistic characteristics (technique and the production of objects), and by the fact that it is resolutely informed by the particularities of the autochthonous economy of senses, offers an excellent platform [tremplin, literally “trampoline”] from which to contest the power of ‘domino-centric’ axioms” (ibid, 250). While Ouédraogo’s prominent engagement with interdisciplinary themes, theories, and literatures is laudatory, it is also important to note the degree to which he brings African authors’ work to the fore, often from sources not so easy to find outside of their immediate contexts. The book is not without its minor aggravations, however, and while none is nearly as egregious as the omission of illustrations, once again readers suffer the aversion to indexes that seems the odd affliction of French presses. Overall, though, Arts photographiques en Afrique is a remarkable accomplishment and deserves the attention of visual scholars across geographical areas and academic disciplines.

Recension par Catherine Bouvard dans la revue Hermès, n°52, 2005 :

Jean-Bernard Ouédraogo décortique le métier des studiotistes à Ouagadougou. L'étude de la construction du regard et de son intériorisation est ici couplée à celle de la société du Burkina Faso. En suivant J. -B. Ouédraogo, le lecteur est invité à construire des liaisons entre système social et formation perceptive et à reconnaître des influences (historiques, géographiques) qui prennent corps en élaborant des dispositions esthétiques (reconnaissance, sélection et hiérarchisation des formes) dans la pratique photographique des studiotistes ouagalais. Et cette étude n'oublie pas de considérer la technique photographique comme une marque des rapports sociaux où s'inscrivent les photographes et comme un catalyseur dans la formation de l'expression esthétique. Ainsi, pour reprendre les termes de Hans Belting, «l'expression symbolique» que traduit l'image photographique est ici étudiée selon le versant des conditions sociales de sa mise en oeuvre et selon le versant de sa spécificité technique. Afin d'appliquer ce programme, J.-B. Ouédraogo divise son ouvrage en quatre parties. Le premier chapitre définit les conditions historiques d'extériorisation du regard afin d'identifier l'observateur dans la dynamique sociale. Ensuite, J. -B. Ouédraogo étudie la formation de ce groupe particulier de photographes de studio, pour la plupart formés sur le tas, sans statut professionnel. Or cette conversion professionnelle exige de leur part des inventions et des remises en question de conventions. «Nos photographes s'inscrivent ainsi dans un rapport de rupture avec un passé dévalué. Il faut souligner le fait que, dans la grande majorité des cas, ils ont exercé des métiers manuels avant celui de photographe, ce qui ne manquera pas de produire des effets sur la conceptualisation extérieure de leur expérience de la sélection des formes. [... ] L'origine sociale est la plus décisive. » (p. 106). Au troisième chapitre, le lecteur comprend enfin qu'au milieu de ces influences sociales et historiques, les normes techniques et visuelles jouent aussi un rôle essentiel dans l'émergence d'une nouvelle esthétique. À partir du constat sur les défaillances techniques et sur «l'absence d'intellectualisation savante», l'auteur montre, en dernière partie, la capacité des studiotistes ouagalais à composer leur style pour produire une esthétique ajustée à l'ordre social naissant. Sont ainsi remis en question des préjugés tendant à donner une définition universelle du jugement esthétique. Le travail de l'auteur repose en partie sur un corpus important d'enquêtes par questionnaires. Si quelques propos en sont rapportés, il est toutefois dommage de ne pas donner au lecteur l'occasion de pouvoir s'investir et comprendre la complexité du phénomène étudié au-delà des quelques extraits. Ni profil d'identité, ni contexte social des enquêtés ne nous sont donnés. De même, dans la troisième partie, sont faits des renvois à des photographies qui ne sont pas reproduites. Il en résulte une certaine frustration à ne pas pouvoir suivre l'auteur jusqu'au bout de son analyse. Nous sommes in fine introduits dans l'ambiance d'un studio puisqu'il s'agit d'examiner le déroulement complet de la pratique photographique où sont «sélectionnés des "moments" particuliers et révélateurs à la fois de la singularité des techniques impliquées et des formes de représentations imagées engagées dans leur usage. » Toutefois, fait défaut, à mon avis, une étude plus approfondie de l'étendue de la pratique photographique des studiotistes. À savoir que les origines des usages sociaux de la photographie sont
également influencées par la pratique des amateurs - ou en amateur. Ces producteurs d'images répondent à un «besoin identitaire que les grands symboles littéraires de la Nation ne peuvent plus assurer seuls [... ] l'art et les images ouvrent une voie nouvelle pour la conception de l'unité nationale. » Ce constat, qui s'applique à l'Allemagne des années 1890 à 1910, trouve écho dans l'analyse de J.-B. Ouédraogo. La photographie amateur a impulsé, notamment dans la photographie d'illustration, un nouveau mouvement en portant les intentions sur d'autres raisons que scientifiques ou documentaires. Les instantanés de la vie quotidienne ont intéressé un large public dès que les possibilités techniques l'ont permis. L'influence des amateurs est importante. Les photographes actuels sont le mélange de ces deux pôles auxquels ils ajoutent leurs connaissances techniques et leur sens esthétique. La pratique photographique des studiotistes répond à des fonctions sociales particulières, notamment celles de s'affranchir des traditions et d'impulser une construction symbolique à une société naissante. Par ailleurs, «si la fonction sociale qui fait exister la photographie définit en même temps les limites dans lesquelles elle peut exister et exclut son propre dépassement vers une pratique d'un autre type»3, on ne connaît pas vraiment les limites de cette pratique dans l'étude de J. -B. Ouédraogo. Celles-ci seraient d'une part à définir et d'autre part à expliquer, d'autant plus que nous sommes amenés avec l'auteur à constater une dynamique certaine chez les studiotistes pouvant aboutir à une pratique photographique créatrice de nouvelles formes. Certes l'auteur parvient en interrogeant «la pratique photographique, sous l'angle du «fait social total [à ouvrir] la perspective de découvrir les conditions dynamiques du procès de civilisation qui est en oeuvre. » (p. 21). Reste à considérer la totalité de cette pratique et à suivre son évolution et son éventuel élargissement à une pratique populaire.


Très peu d'études ont été consacrées au travail en Afrique, bien qu'il constitue une dimension essentielle des rapports sociaux. On peut s'étonner que l'étude de l'univers du travail, qui a accompagné le progrès de l'industrialisation en Occident, n'ait guère suscité l'engouement des spécialistes du développement, normalement préoccupés par l'évolution de populations brutalement plongées dans l'univers inédit de la production mécanique et marchande. Les chercheurs ont été plus enclins à découvrir dans les modes de vie africains l'expression originelle d'un rapport séculaire au monde sensible, que traduiraient les mythes et les rites marqués d'un symbolisme naïf et irréductible. Or l'analyse des situations de travail est une occasion précieuse pour saisir le sens social local, et la façon dont s'invente un ordre social nouveau, tenu de composer constamment avec des cadres de référence hétérogènes. Pour comprendre les engagements productifs, il faut alors étudier le procès immédiat de travail, l'usage des dispositifs techniques et les formes d'action collective.



http://www.africanbookscollective.com/books/frontieres-de-la-citoyennete-et-violence-politique

This book seeks to explain the events that have been taking place in Côte d'Ivoire since 1999 and which are commonly referred to as 'la crise ivoirienne' (the Ivorian crisis). It seems that the day to day interpretation of the events did not provide a satisfactory explanation of the deep fracture and that it was necessary to reconsider the essentialist theoretical categories that are striving to impose on us a false view, madeethnocentric prejudices. To avoid falling into the trap of the day to day interpretation of events will require an in-depth questioning of the causes of the foreseen collapse of the Ivorian model. Having a grasp on the historical meaning of facts is required in examining the sequence and interconnection of events which we always need to rule on the historical weight in order to gauge the tragic trend of the social dynamics. While looking for the causes of the social and political rift, the authors of this volume started by asking a central question: How does the weight of the modern Ivorian society formation intervene in the modalities of the actions of individuals and current collectivities? The brutal and violent fracture which the Ivorian social formation underwent brings forth, once again, the issue of collective identities and unveils, at the same time, the challenges related to the incomplete nature of the construction of 'Nation States' in Africa. In fact, it is a mistake to think that the crisis spontaneously started among partisan higher authorities and to ignore that behind the ostentatious declarations on National Unity, pre-colonial groups have not completely melted into the modern 'Nation'. Furthermore, in the process of 'national' social space formation, new social combinations emerge by continuously re-inventing themselves. It seems that the roots of current crises reside in the unprecedented transformation which contemporary African societies have been undergoing cumbersome by continuously re-inventing themselves. It seems that the roots of current crises reside in the unprecedented transformation which contemporary African societies have been undergoing.


Une actualité tragique a soudainement transformé les mots Rwanda, Ethiopie, Soudan, Niger et Mali en des termes génériques des conflits dits ethniques et des "haines ancestrales" dites tribales. L'ouvrage expose, avec rigueur, une analyse "désenchantée" de la violence basée sur une observation, sur le terrain, des conditions matérielles et symboliques des conflits "communautaires" pour mettre en examen les explications ethniques ou tribales si hâtivement convoquées mais qui masquent d'autant plus qu'on les croit évidentes.

Recension par Jean Copans dans la revue Cahiers d'études africaines, Vol. 38, N°150, 1998 :

cea_0008_0055_1998_num_38_150_1823_t1_0712_0000_2_1

http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/cea_0008-0055_1998_num_38_150_1823_t1_0712_0000_2

Recension parue dans Figurations. Newsletter of the Norbert Elias Foundation, Issue No. 10 December 1998:

The subtitle of this illuminating study is 'The Comoé region between modes of competition and logics of destruction'. It takes its departure from the 1995 inter-communal massacres in Burkina Faso but goes on to draw on a wealth of historical and social scientific literature, including the works of Norbert Elias, Pierre Bourdieu, J.-C. Passeron and others to throw light on the 'processes of violence' involved. This wide ranging study represents a major contribution to understanding violence in general, and it is especially fascinating for its use of Elias's work and other views of European development to contemporary Africa.

Recension par Jean-Pierre Jacob dans le Bulletin de l'APAD (Association Euro-africaine pour l'Anthropologie du changement social et du développement), n°17, 1999:

Fin connaisseur du sud‑ouest burkinabè (il nous avait donné il y a quelques années un livre remarquable sur la Société Sucrière de la Comoë), Jean‑Bernard Ouédraogo nous propose une histoire du pays karaboro et de son voisinage (gouin, dogossè, turka, toussian, peul) de la fin de l'époque coloniale à nos jours. Il s'agit d'un essai politique plus que d'une monographie, ainsi que le titre et l'optique résolument mésographique de l'étude nous invitent à le comprendre. Ce que montre l'auteur, avec la maestria qui le caractérise, c'est l'évolution des rapports intra et inter‑ethniques sous la double influence d'un désenchantement progressif du monde et de l'échec du projet intégrateur de l'Etat post‑colonial. Il explique notamment l'engouement temporaire pour les fétiches thérapeutiques et anti‑sorcellaires en vogue dans les années cinquante (Allacoura, mais aussi dans d'autres zones Tigari et autres Thiu ou Wuo bié...), transversaux aux ethnies de l'ouest qui les achètent sans problème à leurs voisins, à partir des demandes locales de stabilité, c'est‑à‑dire à la fois de solidarité et de justice, dans un contexte peu à peu déstructuré par les relations marchandes de la fin de l'époque coloniale. "Les conditions sociales de cette croyance reposent, dit‑il, sur le besoin d'équilibre social qu'impose la
croissance de la guerre de tous contre tous" (p.64). Il note par ailleurs que l'Etat post‑colonial, censé être l'animateur et le diffuseur des normes modernes, s'est rapidement révélé incapable de répondre à ces types de demandes et d'intégrer à un niveau supérieur l'ensemble social dont il a la charge. Dans le contexte actuel de
concurrence pour l'accès aux ressources naturelles entre groupes locaux (notament entre paysans karaboro et éleveurs peul), l'obsolescence rapide des fétiches sus‑mentionnés et d'une manière générale l'état de "désacralisation du monde", le discrédit de pouvoirs publics considérés comme" une instance privée, qui prend partie" (132), entraînent un recours croissant à l'affrontement physique pour régler les problèmes. L'Etat étant incapable d'assurer la justice, l'usage de la violence domine ‑ comme le massacre de Peuls à Mangodara en février 1995 auquel il est fait référence au début du livre ‑ et ses instigateurs réinventent pour agir des patriotismes locaux, fondés sur "une régression ethnique" (Guichaoua). Une idée circule et elle rencontrerait, selon J‑B Ouédraogo, un succès croissant dans les campagnes africaines : l'élimination de l'autre serait la condition sine qua non de l'accès au bien‑être.

http://apad.revues.org/document514.html.